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Jean Johnson

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Jean Johnson    

           

 

Jean Johnson

PhD, RN, FAAN

Johnson's Theory is "Discrepancy between expected and experienced physical sensations (what is felt seen, heard, tasted, and smelled) during a threatening experience will result in distress."

The middle range nursing theory by Jean Johnson indicates that affective and psychomotor knowledge and preparation prior to threatening events such as surgery increases cooperation and decreases anxiety about those events. For the quality outcome of decreased anxiety to occur, however, the nurse in practice, must apply the key elements of the middle range theory (e.g. preoperative teaching is specific to and congruent with the actual experience of the patient).

As a surgical nurse, Dr. Jean Johnson "had a hunch" that patient’s distress during and after surgery or invasive procedures could be reduced by patient teaching. There was no research indicating what kind of teaching would reduce anxiety, and information can make some patients fearful and more anxious. She wanted a better way to calm the patient who fears the worst and went on to much more: Innovation in patient-teaching techniques applicable today.

 

Academic Profile: Jean Johnson, PhD,RN,FAAN Professor Emerita of Nursing. University of Rochester, New York.

Program of Research: Studies and their Hypotheses by Jean Johnson, RN, PhD, University of Kansas.

Lecture: J. Johnson. Module A. University of Kansas School of Nursing.

Johnson says: “Placebo responses by patients can result from suggestions made by nurses.” She explains that nurses can foster beneficial placebo effects.

Quotes from paper The Placebo Phenomenon’. Jeffrey Zurlinden, RN, MS, ACRN    

Study based on the research of Jean Johnson, PhD, RN, which indicates that distress during a threatening event is reduced. Research Highlights Oncology Nursing Society. Pittsburgh.

Short paper:  Guidelines for Quality Research Proposal University of Kansas.

  • Sensation theory - Johnson's Theory is "Discrepancy between expected and experienced physical sensations (what is felt seen, heard, tasted, and smelled) during a threatening experience will result in distress." (Information from Nursingtheory.net)

Last Modified: Thursday May 20, 2010

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