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Susie Walking Bear Yellowtail

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Susie
Walking Bear Yellowtail
 

 

 

Susie Walking Bear Yellowtail

1903-1981

 

Susie Walking Bear Yellowtail was born on January 27, 1903, near Pryor, to Walking Bear (a Crow) and Jane White Horse (a Sioux).
Susie completed her formal education by training at the Franklin County Memorial Hospital in Northfield and then practicing at Boston City Hospital.
Susie Walking Bear emerged from these years of study as the first American Indian graduate Registered Nurse, fully prepared to pursue her dream of dedicating her life to helping Native American peoples. In1929, she married Tom Yellowtail, a Crow religious leader and the source of
spiritual strength for Susie throughout her life.
Mrs. Yellowtail applied her nursing skills extensively on the Crow Reservation, eventually taking a position with the Indian Health Service. Later, under the auspices of the U.S. Public Health Service, Susie traveled to reservations throughout America, assessing health, social and education problems and recommending solutions.
One of Susie’s most cherished distinctions was granted in 1978, when the American Indian Nurses Association named her “Grandmother of American Indian Nurses.”
Susie Walking Bear Yellowtail was an extraordinary Native American leader. She embodied wisdom, vision, and the determination to accomplish her goals. Susie tailored her life to serve as a bridge between Native American peoples and non-Indians.

Last Modified: Thursday May 20, 2010




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